Toli Papadopoulos, Author at Education Matters Magazine - Page 161 of 172
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Toli Papadopoulos

Isabel Lucas

Isabel Lucas lends hand to support La Trobe's Aspire Program

You can view a video promoting the event, here. A similar event took place at La Trobe’s Bendigo campus. “It’s great to see my University encouraging and supporting community-minded Australians,” said Ms Henshaw. “Aspire is really popular with student at La Trobe, so I really encourage Year 12 student to investigate their options and apply.” All told, La Trobe gave away 700 pizzas in Melbourne and 600 in Bendigo to create awareness for Aspire. “We saw record numbers attending this year and with good reason; our theme for the day was employability, which sits perfectly alongside everything that we are doing with Aspire,” said a La Trobe spokesperson. “Since its inception in 2014, the Aspire Program has seen considerable growth. In 2015, we made over 1,600 early offers to community minded students. We expect to see greater numbers in 2016 with awarenes of the program growing year-on-year.” Students applying to the Aspire Program are assessed based on their community engagement experience, which they demonstrate in a 400-word statement. La Trobe also seeks an endorsement from each applicant’s school. Sydonny, a second year Outdoor Education student at La Trobe Bendigo, received an early offer through the Aspire Program, having volunteered at a charity camp called ‘The Portsea Camp’ for two years prior to finishing high school. “I found the Aspire Program incredibly worthwhile,” she said. “Not only did I receive my conditional offer before I went into exams, I also attended free revision lectures for each of my subjects. “Giving back to the community should be an integral part in everyone’s life regardless of the reward. However, I have always benefited from volunteering – not only do you receive the gratitute of those you are assisting, but it can also mean learning new skills, developing wok ethic, possible career options, friendships and networking opportunities.” Sydonny continues to volunteer regularly with The Portsea Camp. To learn more about La Trobe’s Aspire Program, visit the university’s website.]]>

Isabel Lucas

Isabel Lucas lends hand to support La Trobe’s Aspire Program

Earlier this month, three celebrities joined crowds at La Trobe University’s Melbourne campus open day to help promote its early admissions program, Aspire.

The Aspire initiative is designed to reward secondary students who have actively engaged with their community through volunteering and service, by providing early offers into La Trobe even before they’ve completed their final year exams, let alone received an ATAR score.

To promote Aspire, actress Isabel Lucas, model Laura Henshaw and North Melbourne AFL player Luke McDonald assisted in providing sustenance for the masses with a ‘Pay-It-Forward-Pizza’ initiative, whereby people who received a pizza from the three stars were encouraged to pass their empty pizza box to a stranger, which could then be redeemed for a fresh one.

You can view a video promoting the event, here. A similar event took place at La Trobe’s Bendigo campus.

“It’s great to see my University encouraging and supporting community-minded Australians,” said Ms Henshaw. “Aspire is really popular with student at La Trobe, so I really encourage Year 12 student to investigate their options and apply.”

All told, La Trobe gave away 700 pizzas in Melbourne and 600 in Bendigo to create awareness for Aspire.

“We saw record numbers attending this year and with good reason; our theme for the day was employability, which sits perfectly alongside everything that we are doing with Aspire,” said a La Trobe spokesperson.

“Since its inception in 2014, the Aspire Program has seen considerable growth. In 2015, we made over 1,600 early offers to community minded students. We expect to see greater numbers in 2016 with awarenes of the program growing year-on-year.”

Students applying to the Aspire Program are assessed based on their community engagement experience, which they demonstrate in a 400-word statement. La Trobe also seeks an endorsement from each applicant’s school.

Sydonny, a second year Outdoor Education student at La Trobe Bendigo, received an early offer through the Aspire Program, having volunteered at a charity camp called ‘The Portsea Camp’ for two years prior to finishing high school.

“I found the Aspire Program incredibly worthwhile,” she said. “Not only did I receive my conditional offer before I went into exams, I also attended free revision lectures for each of my subjects.

“Giving back to the community should be an integral part in everyone’s life regardless of the reward. However, I have always benefited from volunteering – not only do you receive the gratitute of those you are assisting, but it can also mean learning new skills, developing wok ethic, possible career options, friendships and networking opportunities.”

Sydonny continues to volunteer regularly with The Portsea Camp.

To learn more about La Trobe’s Aspire Program, visit the university’s website.

Science students

Argument against STEM focus

As politicians continue to spruik the benefits of refocusing Australia’s education focus on STEM learning, the Grattan Institute has suggested this shouldn’t result in pushing students towards science degrees.

Read more

Online video games

Research: Online games boost student scores

A study from RMIT University reveals teenagers who regularly play video games online tend to receive higher school grades.

This contrasts with another finding: those visiting Facebook or chat-based websites every day are more likely to realise decreased performance in maths, reading and science.

The study used data collated by the internationally recognised Program for International Student Assessment (PISA), which was in turn analysed by Asasociate Professor Alberto Posso from RMIT’s School of Economics, Finance and Marketing.

Published in the International Journal of Communication, the paper provides a snapshot of some of the pressures placed on today’s teens in Australia.

PISA’s database included tests from more than 12,000 Australian 15-year-olds in maths, reading and science, alongside additional information on the students’ online activities.

Assoc. Prof. Posso found that students “who play online video games every day score 15 points above the average in maths and 17 points above the average in science”.

“When you play online games you’re solving puzzles to move to the next level and that involves using some of the general knowledge and skills in maths, reading and science that you’ve been taught during the day,” he said.

As a result, the academic suggests educators consider how to incorporate popular video games into their teaching, “so long as they’re not violent ones”.

By comparison, students that regularly sent time on social media scored 20 points worse in maths than students who had never used those platforms, but Posso still recommends incorporating the technology as a method of assisting students who fall behind.

“Teachers might want to look at blending the use of Facebook into their classes as a way of helping those students engage.”

The researcher also stresses that there could be other factors having major impacts that hamper teenager scholastic progress, and missing school could be as bad or worse as regularly using social media.

Students from minority ethnic or linguistic groups were also at increased risk of falling behind than those using Facebook or chat sites each day.

Tork SmartOne dispenser

Top marks for school washroom improvements

Every school has differences – each offers its own brand of education and point of focus. But a common story is that, almost all schools have washroom issues. Some schools suffer with more serious issues such as pilferage and vandalism while others, like Goulburn South Public School were experiencing annoying mess and mischief. These are problems shared by many.

Bev Grant, School Administration Manager of Goulburn South Public School in country NSW is responsible for keeping her school running smoothly. So when a student decides it’s a good idea to try to flush a toilet roll, everyone turns to Bev to fix it. “I get the call to go and fish yet another toilet roll out of the toilet,” she explained. It was enough to prompt Bev to look for a better alternative.

A smarter alternative was found at a conference in Sydney where Bev was introduced to a Tork® SmartOne® toilet paper dispenser. The high capacity system is lockable so the refill is secured away from mischievous students. It cleverly dispenses one sheet at a time and can reduce consumption by up to 40 percent. This means fewer refills and less maintenance and storage. The SmartOne dispensers are also shock and tamper proof and fire resistant – perfect for any school washroom.

The school had a range of different dispensers before switching to Tork. Other problems included finding towels to fit old dispensers, mess and waste. But a big expense was the cost of plumbing due to hand towel being flushed down the toilet and blocking the pipes. Tork H3 dispensers have now been installed with flushable hand towel refills and the school hasn’t had an issue since. “We actually will never know if the students are still flushing them because we don’t have any blockages anymore,” said Bev.

Hygiene is obviously important in all schools to prevent the spread of germs. But at Goulburn South, soap and towel dispensers have also been installed outside classrooms to encourage students to wash their hands before and after eating to help protect the students with allergies.

Changes like these usually come at a cost that many schools cannot afford. With the Tork Advantage program, dispensers are supplied free on loan as long as Tork refills are purchased. And it’s working for Goulburn South. “The best thing, honestly, is that it didn’t cost anything for the dispensers. It puts it within reach for smaller schools.”

Sid Takla, Executive General Manager B2B, Asaleo Care sees the benefits for schools of all sizes, “With minimum outlay, schools can upgrade their washroom facilities and do away with many of the issues, they have come to put up with. Issues such as overconsumption, waste and mess in the washroom can be a thing of the past.”

All in all, from needing to replenish refills less often to the washrooms looking, “so much tidier,” the changeover for Goulburn South has been a huge success. Bev reiterated, “I’m really happy with the Tork product, so I’ve told the school up the road about it.”

About Tork

Tork is the leading global brand in workplace hygiene. From paper towels in hospital washrooms to napkin dispensers in restaurant dining rooms, Tork delivers a great experience for the user and a convenient experience for the buyer. Tork is dedicated to serving your needs in a sustainable way – saving you time, money and effort, so you can focus on what matters most to your business. SCA licence the Tork trademark exclusively to Asaleo Care for use in Australasia.

To keep up with the latest Tork news and innovations, please visit: www.tork.com.au or www.tork.co.nz.

About Asaleo Care

Asaleo Care is a leading hygiene and personal care company that manufactures, markets, distributes and sells Personal Care and Tissue products used every day in households and businesses across Australia, New Zealand, Fiji and a number of other countries in the Pacific. Asaleo Care’s portfolio of market-leading brands includes Sorbent, Handee, Purex, Libra, TENA, Tork, Treasures, Deeko, Viti and Orchid.

With eleven manufacturing and distribution facilities throughout Australia, New Zealand and Fiji, Asaleo Care employs about 1,000 people who work together to make it easier for hygiene, health and wellbeing to be part of everyday life.

For more information visit www.asaleocare.com.