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Catholic school cuts could 'work against govt'

ABC News the changes would result in funding cuts across its schools, and fees would rise as a result. It has called on the Government to release further details and consult with the sector. “Here is a policy that is alienating voters and I think that it will work against the Government,” Tim McDonald, National Catholic Education Commission West Australian director, told ABC News. However, Grattan Institute School Education Program Director Pete Goss told ABC News the Government’s policy was trying to end the funding wars. “The Catholic Schools are saying that under the current deal they are going to be worse off and that is probably correct, but the current deal was too generous for everybody,” he said. “The Government is saying that Catholic schools will get more money. “I think the Government is basically right, but I think there is one clear exception which is Catholic Schools in the ACT, which have been on an unusual deal for a while that has been very generous to them.”]]>

Child and blackboard

Tasmania’s share of Gonski funding

Tasmania will be the greatest recipient per student of funding from Gonski 2.0, Premier Will Hodgman says.

The Premier told News Corp the Federal Government’s proposed funding arrangement would result in about $200 million for Tasmanian schools over 10 years.

“We will be the greatest recipient per student of funding via Gonski 2.0 [which] is a significant positive outcome for our state,” he said.

As part of its 2017 budget, the Federal Government revealed an $18.6 billion increase in funding for Australian schools over the next decade and has asked businessman David Gonski, who advised the former Labor government on funding, to prepare a new “Gonski 2.0” report on how to lift students’ results.

Independent Schools Tasmania executive director Tony Crehan told News Corp the new deal would deliver “fairly steady increases in funding for all Tasmanian students for the next 10 years”.

“That gives schools funding certainty,” Mr Crehan said.

He said, while Tasmania would have benefited from the previous Gonski agreement, “there’s a general feeling that the Government couldn’t ­afford that and came up with an alternative plan, which I think is acceptable and gives us some certainty”.

Mr Crehan said he had concerns about funding for students with disabilities.

The Australian Education Union told the publication Tasmanian public schools next year would receive $7.4 million under the deal, compared with $50 million promised under the previous Gonski deal.

The union’s Tasmanian president, Helen Richardson, said the Federal Government’s school funding estimator showed Clarendon Vale Primary School, in one of Australia’s most disadvantaged communities, would receive $16,000 next year, compared with independent The Friends’ School’s $318,300.

But Tasmanian Education Minister Jeremy Rockliff told News Corp that was a dishonest comparison to make as the estimator only showed federal funding.

The State Government is the main provider of funds to government schools and its contribution is not included in the estimator.

“For example, Clarendon Vale Primary School is also receiving $1.61 million in total from the State Government in 2017,” Mr Rockliff said.

Child and blackboard

Tasmania's share of Gonski funding

News Corp the Federal Government’s proposed funding arrangement would result in about $200 million for Tasmanian schools over 10 years. “We will be the greatest recipient per student of funding via Gonski 2.0 [which] is a significant positive outcome for our state,” he said. As part of its 2017 budget, the Federal Government revealed an $18.6 billion increase in funding for Australian schools over the next decade and has asked businessman David Gonski, who advised the former Labor government on funding, to prepare a new “Gonski 2.0” report on how to lift students’ results. Independent Schools Tasmania executive director Tony Crehan told News Corp the new deal would deliver “fairly steady increases in funding for all Tasmanian students for the next 10 years”. “That gives schools funding certainty,” Mr Crehan said. He said, while Tasmania would have benefited from the previous Gonski agreement, “there’s a general feeling that the Government couldn’t ­afford that and came up with an alternative plan, which I think is acceptable and gives us some certainty”. Mr Crehan said he had concerns about funding for students with disabilities. The Australian Education Union told the publication Tasmanian public schools next year would receive $7.4 million under the deal, compared with $50 million promised under the previous Gonski deal. The union’s Tasmanian president, Helen Richardson, said the Federal Government’s school funding estimator showed Clarendon Vale Primary School, in one of Australia’s most disadvantaged communities, would receive $16,000 next year, compared with independent The Friends’ School’s $318,300. But Tasmanian Education Minister Jeremy Rockliff told News Corp that was a dishonest comparison to make as the estimator only showed federal funding. The State Government is the main provider of funds to government schools and its contribution is not included in the estimator. “For example, Clarendon Vale Primary School is also receiving $1.61 million in total from the State Government in 2017,” Mr Rockliff said.]]>

New high school for students in inner Sydney

A new high-rise school will be built in inner Sydney, New South Wales Education Minister Rob Stokes announced.

The new high school, on the corner of Cleveland and Chalmers streets in Surry Hills, will provide 1200 new places for students in inner Sydney.

“Schools will need to accommodate an extra 269,000 students by 2031, 164,000 of whom will be in the public system. More than 80 per cent of this growth will be in Sydney,” Mr Stokes said.

The school will have the equivalent of 47 traditional classrooms with open and informal learning areas, practical activities areas, seminar and presentation spaces.

The yet-to-be-named school is expected to have:
• three science labs
• a food technology unit
• a visual arts unit
• a performing arts workshop
• music practice rooms
• a design and technology workshop
• a gymnasium and movement studio
• an outdoor games court
• a central resource library with mini-libraries throughout the school

Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp has been announced as the head design consultant and architect following a design competition run by the Department of Education, in consultation with the Department of Planning & Environment and the City of Sydney.

“This design stood out for its vision of a future-focused learning environment while preserving the heritage of this site,” Mr Stokes said.

The comprehensive school will be for students in years 7 to 12 and is expected to open in 2020.

Cleveland Street Intensive English High School, which is currently on the site, will move to a purpose-built school on Mitchell Road in Alexandria next year.

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