Gonski 2.0 Archives - Education Matters Magazine
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Grattan Institute calls for new roles for top teachers

A new Grattan Institute report is calling for new roles for Australia’s top teachers to help transform Australian schools and assist students to gain an additional 18 months of learning by the time they turn 15.

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VIDEO: Gonski 2.0: Reflections and directions

Professor Chris Davison, Adrian Piccoli and Pasi Sahlberg from the UNSW Sydney Gonski Institute for Education presented their thoughts and recommendations on the recently released Gonski 2.0, during a forum at UNSW on 29 May 2018.

 

Catholic school cuts could ‘work against govt’

The Catholic education sector has warned of a voter backlash after the Federal Government announced its latest funding model.

Under the proposed Gonski 2.0 funding, a patchwork of 27 agreements will be rolled into a single, needs-based model, meaning all non-government schools will be brought into line with the school resourcing standard within 10 years.

All Catholic schools will face a 10-year funding freeze as part of this, expected to leave them with less funding in 2027 than received in 2017.

The Federal Government’s new model is expected to inject an extra $18.6 billion into schools over the next decade.

The National Catholic Education Commission told ABC News the changes would result in funding cuts across its schools, and fees would rise as a result.

It has called on the Government to release further details and consult with the sector.

“Here is a policy that is alienating voters and I think that it will work against the Government,” Tim McDonald, National Catholic Education Commission West Australian director, told ABC News.

However, Grattan Institute School Education Program Director Pete Goss told ABC News the Government’s policy was trying to end the funding wars.

“The Catholic Schools are saying that under the current deal they are going to be worse off and that is probably correct, but the current deal was too generous for everybody,” he said.

“The Government is saying that Catholic schools will get more money.

“I think the Government is basically right, but I think there is one clear exception which is Catholic Schools in the ACT, which have been on an unusual deal for a while that has been very generous to them.”

Catholic school cuts could 'work against govt'

ABC News the changes would result in funding cuts across its schools, and fees would rise as a result. It has called on the Government to release further details and consult with the sector. “Here is a policy that is alienating voters and I think that it will work against the Government,” Tim McDonald, National Catholic Education Commission West Australian director, told ABC News. However, Grattan Institute School Education Program Director Pete Goss told ABC News the Government’s policy was trying to end the funding wars. “The Catholic Schools are saying that under the current deal they are going to be worse off and that is probably correct, but the current deal was too generous for everybody,” he said. “The Government is saying that Catholic schools will get more money. “I think the Government is basically right, but I think there is one clear exception which is Catholic Schools in the ACT, which have been on an unusual deal for a while that has been very generous to them.”]]>

Child and blackboard

Tasmania’s share of Gonski funding

Tasmania will be the greatest recipient per student of funding from Gonski 2.0, Premier Will Hodgman says.

The Premier told News Corp the Federal Government’s proposed funding arrangement would result in about $200 million for Tasmanian schools over 10 years.

“We will be the greatest recipient per student of funding via Gonski 2.0 [which] is a significant positive outcome for our state,” he said.

As part of its 2017 budget, the Federal Government revealed an $18.6 billion increase in funding for Australian schools over the next decade and has asked businessman David Gonski, who advised the former Labor government on funding, to prepare a new “Gonski 2.0” report on how to lift students’ results.

Independent Schools Tasmania executive director Tony Crehan told News Corp the new deal would deliver “fairly steady increases in funding for all Tasmanian students for the next 10 years”.

“That gives schools funding certainty,” Mr Crehan said.

He said, while Tasmania would have benefited from the previous Gonski agreement, “there’s a general feeling that the Government couldn’t ­afford that and came up with an alternative plan, which I think is acceptable and gives us some certainty”.

Mr Crehan said he had concerns about funding for students with disabilities.

The Australian Education Union told the publication Tasmanian public schools next year would receive $7.4 million under the deal, compared with $50 million promised under the previous Gonski deal.

The union’s Tasmanian president, Helen Richardson, said the Federal Government’s school funding estimator showed Clarendon Vale Primary School, in one of Australia’s most disadvantaged communities, would receive $16,000 next year, compared with independent The Friends’ School’s $318,300.

But Tasmanian Education Minister Jeremy Rockliff told News Corp that was a dishonest comparison to make as the estimator only showed federal funding.

The State Government is the main provider of funds to government schools and its contribution is not included in the estimator.

“For example, Clarendon Vale Primary School is also receiving $1.61 million in total from the State Government in 2017,” Mr Rockliff said.

Child and blackboard

Tasmania's share of Gonski funding

News Corp the Federal Government’s proposed funding arrangement would result in about $200 million for Tasmanian schools over 10 years. “We will be the greatest recipient per student of funding via Gonski 2.0 [which] is a significant positive outcome for our state,” he said. As part of its 2017 budget, the Federal Government revealed an $18.6 billion increase in funding for Australian schools over the next decade and has asked businessman David Gonski, who advised the former Labor government on funding, to prepare a new “Gonski 2.0” report on how to lift students’ results. Independent Schools Tasmania executive director Tony Crehan told News Corp the new deal would deliver “fairly steady increases in funding for all Tasmanian students for the next 10 years”. “That gives schools funding certainty,” Mr Crehan said. He said, while Tasmania would have benefited from the previous Gonski agreement, “there’s a general feeling that the Government couldn’t ­afford that and came up with an alternative plan, which I think is acceptable and gives us some certainty”. Mr Crehan said he had concerns about funding for students with disabilities. The Australian Education Union told the publication Tasmanian public schools next year would receive $7.4 million under the deal, compared with $50 million promised under the previous Gonski deal. The union’s Tasmanian president, Helen Richardson, said the Federal Government’s school funding estimator showed Clarendon Vale Primary School, in one of Australia’s most disadvantaged communities, would receive $16,000 next year, compared with independent The Friends’ School’s $318,300. But Tasmanian Education Minister Jeremy Rockliff told News Corp that was a dishonest comparison to make as the estimator only showed federal funding. The State Government is the main provider of funds to government schools and its contribution is not included in the estimator. “For example, Clarendon Vale Primary School is also receiving $1.61 million in total from the State Government in 2017,” Mr Rockliff said.]]>